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20121224
20121224
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to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this proje
across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
people. can you talk a little bit about how that works in a city? >> yeah. well, first of all, i've had lots of conversations with people who, quote-unquote, have made it, and when they were in tough times from famous people like tyler perry who was homeless, living in a car, to people i know throughout my community who have got, broken drug addictions, who have dealt with brutal, brutal hatred because they came out of the closet at a young age. all these stories. and it's amazing to me that everybody, including tyler perry, has these stories about how one perp's small act of -- one person's small act of kindness was a difference maker for them. and it gives me chills to think that the biggest thing we actually do on any given day probably could be a small act of kindness to someone else. and so the vulnerability and fragility of life you really get to see up close and personal in cities like ours here in new york and ours in newark, new jersey, and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for a kid. and i see, and i was very happy during sandy, we were able to do some things th
plans. good morning, welcome to "starting point." chilly in new york city. 7:00 in the morning. i'm alina cho in new york. >> and i'm dana bash in washington. monday, december 24th. christmas eve. "starting point" begins right now. >> and our "starting point," a u.s. contractor in kabul gunned down and killed this morning by a woman wearing an afghan police uniform. it happened inside kabul's police headquarters. the latest in a string of suspected green on blue attacks that are hitting morale and eroding trust in allies there. our pentagon correspond respondent barbara starr up early for us working her sources. joins us live from washington with more. >> good morning, alina. in the last few minutes, our nato sources are confirming privately that, indeed, it was an american citizen. a contractor shot and killed by a woman, an afghan woman in a police uniform inside kabul police headquarters. what is not known at this point or they are not saying, whether this woman was an afghan police officer or came into possession of the uniform, stole it. we have seen these kinds of incidents
you couldn't carry a gun around in the town like dodge city is a good example. there were walls against that. if you are a cowboy that came in when you were supposed to go story or pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way that most people think about it. >> guest: this is of course settlements out in the wild prairie, but they are like towns everywhere today. you need to call and order in the towns and it's hard to keep that up. >> host: even the shootout at the corral was a starting point. >> guest: clams and i think it was had been arrested or accused of violating below will ordinance and forbade carrying a local firearm. incidentally the understanding of what gun rights were for beginning to evolve in the 19th century, and in particular in the south in the early 19th century it was a big problem with duals the most famous one is aaron burr and hamilton, but this was fairly common but it was frowned upon and it can be prosecuted and he had to keep moving around to avoid being prosecuted, so but one of the names of people who insisted on the spot started to
or -- >> guest: dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to deposit your arms. if you were a cowboy who came in from the plains there was place where you were supposed to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that didn't fit with the way most people think about it. >> guest: this is in settlements. knotted out in the wild prairie. but they're like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in towns and it's hard to keep that up if erv is pull ought a pistol. >> host: even the shootout at the okay corral was gun control. >> guest: it started because of ike had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that forbids carrying a firearm openly around town. >> host: incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for began to evolve in the 19th century in particular in the south. in the earl 19th century there was a big problem with duels. duels between gentlemen, obviously the most famous one is aaron burr and alexander hamilton. but this is dueling was fairly common, about it was frowned upon, and could be prosecuted, and had to ke
and avoid being left in... the dark. hey look! the fear book gives his number in new york city. i'll call him on my smellular phone. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ nice view, hey poyo! look at all them people way down there. they look like aunts. oh, spooky! i'm sure there's a couple of uncles too and cousins and grandmothers and sisters (phone ringing) what do you want? oh, i'm honored you guys are calling. it's the ghostly trio, my heroes. say, how'd you like to come out to kriss, massachusetts and uh do some scaring for us? you guys want me to join your group? you're exactly what we need. no one else can do but you. we'd love to have you. yeah and we're not lying 'cause we're desparate or nothing. this is the all-time best break i ever got. my chance to be part of the scream team. but, uh have to think about it. i have to get back to you. how can you think about even leavin' new york? it's a heck of a town. the bronx is up. but the battery is down. so is assault, muggins, and purse snatching. i need more scaring opportunities. this offer to join the ghostly trio is my shot at the big leagues. oh,
to temperatures that are much colder in many locations. above freezing in new york city, that colder air is on the way. erie, pennsylvania, 29 degrees and get ready, are y you are lot a white christmas for sure. bundle up in the northern plains. temperatures below freezing in many locations and below zero in others. only 1 degrees there in south dakota. the cold air will be in place across the northern plains. as the front advances it will slide eastward and do a number of things for christmas eve. we're looking at severe storms in areas of beaumont, texas, and houston as well. and we're anticipating more delays. i think the weather will be worse in the east than today. traveling, watch out for cities you see here, may see light snow in places like denver and more measurable snow in salt lake city. we go through the forecast period, into christmas day, the risk for stormy weather and dangerous conditions across the gulf coast. notice the cold air wrapping around, we'll see wet weather and snowy conditions for parts of the midwest south. heavy snow, cleveland and snow north of new york ci
's real the governors, mayors and city states who are going to say, hey, this is going to increase our cost of borrowing. we're barely coming out of recession. you can't do this to us. >> is there a municipality right now that you know is planning on an issue later in 2013 saying this is going to screw us up in a real way? >> i don't know of any specifically, but they're basically all saying it. new york city comes to market multiple times a year. >> all the old bonds will be type. is that right? >> i'm going to make the stand and say that they will. but in the last -- >> then they become more dear, won't it seems to me. >> yeah. but what had happened is that last week and the week before, all of a sudden there was this thought because it had been thrown about that it wouldn't be retroactive. on top of that -- >> why wouldn't that cause him to go up? >> because that means that the tax, the cap on deductions would be retroactive to all bonds. >> it wouldn't be retroactive. >> no. what happened two weeks ago was that had been on the table. >> that it would be retroactive? exactly. >> how
that a lot. finally, it's even been a little slow they say at saks 5th avenue, on 5th avenue in new york city. our producer took these pictures. sw retail advisers says you could, quote, in saks hear a pin drop during a 60% sale going into saturday. but, bill and maria, i was in the very store in new york last week, my first time at saks during this time of the year. if that is slow for christmas, i don't want to know what busy is. i couldn't even get down the aisle. >> by the way, jane wells, you mentioned c's candy. unbelievably, they opened some kiosks in malls in the northeast here this year. >> you're kidding. finally. >> it's fantastic. >> what's next? in and out burger is coming next. that can be the only logical next step. >> we can only hope. please. bring more of california to the northeast. we love that. >> happy holidays, jane. >> thank you. >> you too guys. merry christmas. >>> 15 minutes before the closing bell on this christmas eve we have a market under pressure down about 51 points on the dow jones industrial average. >> up next we ask does santa hate google? >> oh, no. >> of
york city police department for over 18 years now -- i have been a police officer in the new york city police department. i have a chance to interact with the community. >> we have lived here since 2007. we have two girls, one 2, one some months. >> in 2010, we had the fire. denise was at work, and i and my daughter were home. i saw the smoke, and i knew we had to get out right away. that fast, the fire engulfed the house. i had never experienced anything like that before, and that is a feeling i will never forget, seeing your whole house on fire like that. the rebuilding process is tough. yes, for lack of a better word, it has been tough. contractors. >> insurance companies. >> insurance companies. >> at first, we were, like, "we can do this house in six weeks." we did not move back in until february 2012. we started in the basement. >> it is pretty raw. i definitely would like to make it into a place when we come home, a place of relaxation. >> a man cave. >> a man cave. >> he wants to turn it into a man cave. >> our whole house now. >> hey, what's up? how are you? >> good morning. >
was instructed to go to a pay phone in carson city, nevada and await yet another call. dean nelson drove out to the gas station with sinatra. >> i kept telling them once we got them on the phone i want you to keep them on the phone as long as you can. >> to phratrace the call. >> they were able to trace the phone from los angeles and he did talk to frank to find out he was safe. they told us then that they wanted 240,000 dollars. >> sinatra was told the next call would come that night at ex-wife nancy a's home in bellaire, california. they chartered a plane back to la. in the coming days they turned the home into an fbi command center. tina who was 15 years old told fox files exclusively about the familiar lace ordeal and what it was like having the fbi living in their home. >> they were so poised and ever polite, but they would not indulge in conversation and how they would jump when the phone would ring. we freeze, they jump. it was one moment to the next. the whole thing was surreal and strange. >> what was frank sinatra like? was he composed, frantic? >> he was calm. he talked to the kid
said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times" saying no. saying pc sales are lower than expected. you've got microsoft down by about 1%. one of the leaders for the year, you mentioned bank of america, the best performing stock on the dow. a double this year if you're lucky enough to get in on bank of america and stick with that trade. across the board financials seeing a little bit of weakness in today's session. >> keep an eye on facebook. obviously the news a little thin this morning. the sunday "times" of london reporting the company has various methods of tax
in new york city. cnbc producer green took this picture. in saks you could hear a pin drop during a 60% sale going into saturday. now, i was in that very store last week. i have never been in fax fifth avenue during christmas time in manhattan. if that is slow, i would hate to see what busy is, thomas. back to you. >> jane, thanks so much. >>> coming up, mitt romney's son, tag, with some very curious comments about his father's run for president. plus, on the defense. another one of the president's potential cabinet nominees being criticized by republicans and the democrats. we've all had those moments. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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